Author: Anthony

Funktastic Rhythm Play Along – Level 1 (1 Player)

Funktastic Rhythm Play Along – Level 1 (1 Player)

The video contains pausable pages about the rhythms, genre, accompaniment, controls etc and can be used on its own. However below are a number of related resources, information, additional details and support material that you may find useful in making the most of the video. I hope you find them useful. Please let me know what works and what could be improved.

Jump to

Notation Notes

Notation Summary

This play along covers crotchets / quarter notes, equivalent rests and quaver / eighth note pairs.

The play along is organised as a rondo, in the sequence Intro-A-B-A-C-A-D-A with a three part bonus section before the end extending the rhythm patterns.

Here are the rhythms used:

SCREENSHOT

Note Practice

Regular sight reading, discussion and practice of rhythms is a core pillar to helping students develop confidence reading notation.

You can practice identifying, naming and reordering the note lengths in the video by downloading and print or using on screen the rhythm cards set.

Naming and Explaining Notation

You can explain the way to both name and count of the rhythm patterns in a number of ways. All are acceptable, but your school, trust or district may have a preference or agreed method. It is worth checking this, as above everything continuity is key to learner success. Here are several of the ways

Naming Notation

In the UK we refer to these notes as crotchets and quavers.

In the US they are referred to as quarter and eighth notes. This is easier to explain as they are quarters and eighths of a whole note (US) / semibreve (UK).

Recognising Notes

Crotchets / Quarter notes – Students often describe these as looking like a hook, golf clubs or hockey sticks. Key vocabulary to give over time is the note head which is a circle and a stem, which is a vertical line coming out of the (right) side of the note head. It can also be shown upside down.

Quavers / Eighth notes – students often describe the pair of these as looking like ‘old school headphones’. Key vocabulary to give over time is

Counting

In a bar long pattern the most common way to count would be 1 2 3 4. Some may suggest 1 1 1 1 but that is only really a useful way to consider the pattern when focusing on the length of each note in isolation, which is generally considered less useful. So for quarter notes / crotchets the count would most likely be

1 2 3 4

SCREENSHOT

Where you are then using eighth notes / quavers you would then count

1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &

At this level the patterns use eighth notes / quavers in pairs only, so that they equate to a single beat in a bar.

Rhythm Patterns

Notation Set

You can download a free set of notation images to use in class. Go to the notation page to access this resource.

Genre and History Notes

Genre: Funk

Key details to share with learners about funk music are:

  • Influenced and created from a combination of soul, jazz and gospel music
  • Began in the 1960s and still going strong
  • First beat (1) is the strong beat
  • Music is based on riffs more than melody
  • The focus is on rhythmic groove
  • Instrumentation utilises electric bass, drums and often organ
  • Electric guitar riffs
  • Strong horn section
  • Sometimes there are no vocals

History of Funk

Funk music began in the 1960s and continues today in many forms.

You can use the infographic on the history of music page to demonstrate how this fits into the evolution of music.

Related Activities

Activity 1:

Related Videos

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Song Maker Project: Frere Jacques

Song Maker Project: Frere Jacques

The video contains pausable pages about the rhythms, genre, accompaniment, controls etc and can be used on its own. However below are a number of related resources, information, additional details and support material that you may find useful in making the most of the video. I hope you find them useful. Please let me know what works and what could be improved.

Jump to

Genre and History Notes

What is Frere Jacques?

history of the music goes here

History of Frere Jacques

history of the music goes here

History of Music

You can use the infographic on the history of music page to demonstrate how this piece fits into the evolution of music.

About the Music

Lyrics

lyrics of the song go here

Structure

notes about the song structure go here

Rhythms

Notes about the rhythms go here

Notation Set

You can download a free set of notation images to use in class. Go to the notation page to access this resource.

Related Activities

Activity 1:

Text about this activity

Related Videos

Activity 1:

Task

Text about this activity

Task

Text about this activity

Task

Text about this activity

Task

Continue reading

Notation

Notation graphics will be available here early May – come back then 🙂

History of Music

History of Music

The infographics below relate to the history of music. Please feel free to use them in your own teaching if they are useful. You can download them by right clicking and choosing copy or save, or by downloading the editable PowerPoint file. Below the infographics are a number of style summaries that I am writing as I need them.

Infographics

Overview

Contemporary Music

I am working on is infographic right now. Check back soon.

Summaries

Funk

Key details to share with learners about funk music are:

  • Influenced and created from a combination of soul, jazz and gospel music
  • Began in the 1960s and still going strong. This places funk at the beginning of the ‘contemporary’ band of the infographic.
  • First beat (1) is the strong beat
  • Music is based on riffs more than melody
  • The focus is on rhythmic groove
  • Instrumentation utilises electric bass, drums and often organ
  • Electric guitar riffs
  • Strong horn section
  • Sometimes there are no vocals

Continue reading

Music With Mr McNulty

Mr McNulty creates videos as Music Lessons to show to learners, often with teacher to teacher introductions to help you understand what is to be covered. He has great enthusiasm for the range of subjects covered.

He includes Garageband, videos, detailing recording guitar and digital guitar, as well as editing and recording within Garageband. He shows how to  programme and record drums as well as recording an instrument and making music in Garageband.

Mr McNulty has a number of Google Chrome Music Lab related videos, especially using Song Maker and linking with other curricular areas when making music. There is a nice series on using Kandinsky to explore music creation using drawings, focusing on pitch, expression and timbre

Looping and Exploring Rhythm is covered frequently, especially using Super-Looper as a recording app, and making beats, music and learning timing skills.

His Music Theory content covers Reading Notes on the Treble Clef stave with activities, as well as learning first Scales, Identifying Music Notes, and starting to have fun composing simple Music and Rhythms.

Mr McNulty also has a large bank of ukulele and guitar lessons for beginners, including riff of the week to highlight and teach a new motif each time.

YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCes9VPPaMFckk95clVPGZzw

Twitter – http://twitter.com/mrmcnultyteach

Funktastic Rhythm Play Along – Level 2 (1 Player)

Funktastic Rhythm Play Along – Level 2 (1 Player)

The video contains pausable pages about the rhythms, genre, accompaniment, controls etc and can be used on its own. However below are a number of related resources, information, additional details and support material that you may find useful in making the most of the video. I hope you find them useful. Please let me know what works and what could be improved.

Jump to

Notation Notes

Notation Summary

This play along covers crotchets / quarter notes, equivalent rests and quaver / eighth note pairs.

The play along is organised as a rondo, in the sequence Intro-A-B-A-C-A-D-A with a three part bonus section before the end extending the rhythm patterns.

Here are the rhythms used:

SCREENSHOT

Note Practice

Regular sight reading, discussion and practice of rhythms is a core pillar to helping students develop confidence reading notation.

You can practice identifying, naming and reordering the note lengths in the video by downloading and print or using on screen the rhythm cards set.

Naming and Explaining Notation

You can explain the way to both name and count of the rhythm patterns in a number of ways. All are acceptable, but your school, trust or district may have a preference or agreed method. It is worth checking this, as above everything continuity is key to learner success. Here are several of the ways

Naming Notation

In the UK we refer to these notes as crotchets and quavers.

In the US they are referred to as quarter and eighth notes. This is easier to explain as they are quarters and eighths of a whole note (US) / semibreve (UK).

Recognising Notes

Crotchets / Quarter notes – Students often describe these as looking like a hook, golf clubs or hockey sticks. Key vocabulary to give over time is the note head which is a circle and a stem, which is a vertical line coming out of the (right) side of the note head. It can also be shown upside down.

Quavers / Eighth notes – students often describe the pair of these as looking like ‘old school headphones’. Key vocabulary to give over time is

Counting

In a bar long pattern the most common way to count would be 1 2 3 4. Some may suggest 1 1 1 1 but that is only really a useful way to consider the pattern when focusing on the length of each note in isolation, which is generally considered less useful. So for quarter notes / crotchets the count would most likely be

1 2 3 4

SCREENSHOT

Where you are then using eighth notes / quavers you would then count

1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &

At this level the patterns use eighth notes / quavers in pairs only, so that they equate to a single beat in a bar.

Rhythm Patterns

Notation Set

You can download a free set of notation images to use in class. Go to the notation page to access this resource.

Genre and History Notes

Genre: Funk

Key details to share with learners about funk music are:

  • Influenced and created from a combination of soul, jazz and gospel music
  • Began in the 1960s and still going strong
  • First beat (1) is the strong beat
  • Music is based on riffs more than melody
  • The focus is on rhythmic groove
  • Instrumentation utilises electric bass, drums and often organ
  • Electric guitar riffs
  • Strong horn section
  • Sometimes there are no vocals

History of Funk

Funk music began in the 1960s and continues today in many forms.

You can use the infographic on the history of music page to demonstrate how this fits into the evolution of music.

Related Activities

Activity 1:

Related Videos

Continue reading

Microsoft OneNote

OneNote

Digital Tools for Teaching

OneNote is a free whiteboard and digital textbook app from Microsoft. You can access it free through a Microsoft account, or as part of an education M365 account.


OneNote has incredible organisational tools for sections and pages, and can embed a wide range of content on pages, as well as text you type or paste, and digital ink via a touch screen, digital pen or mouse.

Using the Notebook in Class

Students can also open their own copy of your class OneNote notebook, either as a read only document, or as part of a Class notebook in Teams. In this context they can only view the content library pages but edit the pages that you and they put into their own personal student area of the notebook.

Adding Images

Images can be added to a OneNote page by dragging ono the page from your device onto the page, or pasting from the edit menu (or the right click menu). You can also use the insert tab and choose pictures to choose pictures from your documents folders or with the online image search.

Digital Textbook

OneNote uses section groups, sections and pages (as well as nested pages) to organise content in any way that suits you. You can create folders of class lessons, one-off lesson pages right through to a digital textbook for your entire academic year. By combining text, images and video as well as interactive media like forms and links you can create an engaging learning solution that can be accessed on any device app or in the browser.

Printing

You can print OneNote pages should you need to, but you can also print other document types into OneNote, This provides an alternative way to add content to OneNote.

MP3 and Recording

Many file types, including audio can be added to a OneNote page. In the music classroom audio files, mp3, wav and MIDI files can all be added to a page, as a way to share examples to learners, collect ideas or make listening libraries for independent work.

Adding Files to a Page

By dragging or pasting a range of file types onto the page you can choose to either place them on the page where they will stay like a folder, or embed them into the page to be viewed as if open.

Graphic Scores and Tables

You can create a range of graphic scores by either pasting images or creating using the shapes tools built into the app. You can also use the add table tool to great effect to create a range of table based guides and templates for student tasks.

Listening Tasks

By embedding audio recordings or recording straight to the page, you can create bespoke listening tasks for learners, where they can listen to the examples as many times as they need to, and respond directly on the page as either text, ink or audio recording of their own.

Embedding Video

Pasting a link to any of the big video providers (such as YouTube, Vimeo, etc) will automatically embed a small player on the page which can be resized to suit your preference. You can also embed other video content, such as FlipGrid.

Linear Lesson with Video

By organising the content in different ways on the page, you can support learners who need a more linear, step by step approach, as well as those that prefer a more freely explored scrapbook-like layout of content.

Continue reading

Website Rebuild

Well, if it’s not obvious, the website has undergone a massive redesign and refresh. I’m really pleased with how its come together, and how it now allows me to add on new projects, resource areas and ideas in a much more scalable and inclusive way. It’s still WordPress underneath (I love Joomla if I’m honest, but needed a new challenge, so here we are) but I’ve been meaning to pull together ideas and inspiration from a scrapbook of sites, features and tools that I’ve been collecting for some time now.

Well, if it’s not obvious, the website has undergone a massive redesign and refresh. I’m really pleased with how its come together, and how it now allows me to add on new projects, resource areas and ideas in a much more scalable and inclusive way. It’s still WordPress underneath (I love Joomla if I’m honest, but needed a new challenge, so here we are) but I’ve been meaning to pull together ideas and inspiration from a scrapbook of sites, features and tools that I’ve been collecting for some time now. Well, if it’s not obvious, the website has undergone a massive redesign and refresh. I’m really pleased with how its come together, and how it now allows me to add on new projects, resource areas and ideas in a much more scalable and inclusive way. It’s still WordPress underneath (I love Joomla if I’m honest, but needed a new challenge, so here we are) but I’ve been meaning to pull together ideas and inspiration from a scrapbook of sites, features and tools that I’ve been collecting for some time now.

Well, if it’s not obvious, the website has undergone a massive redesign and refresh. I’m really pleased with how its come together, and how it now allows me to add on new projects, resource areas and ideas in a much more scalable and inclusive way. It’s still WordPress underneath (I love Joomla if I’m honest, but needed a new challenge, so here we are) but I’ve been meaning to pull together ideas and inspiration from a scrapbook of sites, features and tools that I’ve been collecting for some time now.

Well, if it’s not obvious, the website has undergone a massive redesign and refresh. I’m really pleased with how its come together, and how it now allows me to add on new projects, resource areas and ideas in a much more scalable and inclusive way. It’s still WordPress underneath (I love Joomla if I’m honest, but needed a new challenge, so here we are) but I’ve been meaning to pull together ideas and inspiration from a scrapbook of sites, features and tools that I’ve been collecting for some time now.

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